man and woman sitting at table with foods

Practical Communication Steps for Family Connection

This past Friday, the Clubhouse social media event that I was moderating called, Healthy Family Connections, included over 75 women discussing how to keep connection during hard conversations. Three key ideas were talked about that are consistent with research findings. It is important to hear and listen to your child, friend, or significant other’s feelings. When we say “You are fine” it is saying that what they are feeling does not matter. This can be Read more…

Top 10 Ways to Communicate

Last week, I facilitated a Healthy Family Connections group on clubhouse that led us to discuss the Top 10 Ways to Communicate. Over 20 women came into the room to listen or speak about this topic during the hour. Many of the women requested the Top 10 Ways to Communicate Quick Sheet following this discussion. This blog will look at the 10 tips with some more communication tips. Model I Feel ___ when you ____ Read more…

Healthy Family Connections: Communication

What do most of us want in life? A family. Family can be both bloodlines where we are born into the family. Also, a family can be a group of people who are not related but consider each other family due to the close bond they have with each other. Family are the people that we want to spend time with and celebrate life’s joys and also life’s pains. For example, we want to call Read more…

Sexual Exploitation Awareness

This is key questions and answers from Dr. Amanda’s podcast and Youtube interview with Tashina Kabbaz, a doctoral student at Lehigh University in the area of educational leadership. She also is an educational and cultural specialist for VAST the Vehicle Against Sex Trafficking in the Lehigh Valley. If you or someone you know needs help, call the National Human Trafficking Hotline toll-free hotline, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 1-888-373-7888 to speak Read more…

man in white shirt carrying girl in gray shirt

The Power of Words 2.0

Recently, I conducted a webinar about the power of words.  Some of the key points are helpful when responding and thinking about the words we use every day. A word by itself does not hold weight until a positive or negative event happens and then positive or negative feelings attach to it. We all have feelings as human beings. Words spoken about us as children can lead to beliefs about ourselves that are not true. Read more…

Three Healthy Ways to Communicate As a Family

Almost 80% of children and youth report their parents and guardians as the people they go to help them make decisions.  What does this mean? It means that if a child or youth is trying to decide something about their life, they want to go to their guardian(s) or parent(s) for help first. Healthy Tip # 1: A child or teen is not afraid to share how they feel with their parent(s) or guardian(s) (Bethel, Read more…

Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Mental Health, and Trauma

What does it mean to navigate through Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD)? BDD is a condition that may influence the amount of times a person view themselves in the mirror but almost as if they have on a distorted lens of themselves. By definition, BDD is a condition that may cause distress in an individual when they view themselves and notice imagined or slight difference in their appearance (Singh & Veale, 2019). BDD may or may Read more…

Compulsive Eating, Emotions, and Stress

Acute or chronic stress may change an individual’s eating patterns due to psychological and emotional stressors (Cameron, Maguire, & McCormack, 2011).  Survivors of sexual trauma may have more psychological and physical stress leading to an increase in food intake that is used as a coping skill. (Connors & Morse, 2006) Binge eating is often thought of as a lack of self-discipline if one provides judgment without knowing a person’s history leading to this behavior. In Read more…

Compulsive Eating (Binge-Eating) Disorder, Mental Health, and Trauma

Binge eating is one disorder that can result to eating food on an ongoing basis and the loss of control of self-discipline and regulation without any form of purging.  A deep description of both disorders will lead to ways to support individuals on this journey.. Traumatic exposure is more common for binge eating subtypes of eating disorders (Brewerton, 2007). Binge eating has a higher correlation to previous sexual trauma, emotional trauma and physical trauma (O’Connor Read more…

Bulimia, Mental Health, and Childhood Trauma

Childhood trauma such as emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect are often a common denominator with eating disorders (Utzinger, Haukebo, Simonich, & Wonderlich, 2018). Eating disorders include binge eating disorders, both Bulimia Nervosa and binge eating disorder without vomiting. Interestingly, a history of emotional abuse happens more often for people diagnosed with bulimia nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa is a result of a person eating regular or large amounts of food and throwing it up Read more…